Dharma Pearls

Translating Classical Buddhism to Modern English

The Related Discourses

1. The Aggregates

15. Teaching Disillusionment

1. Thus I have heard:[1] One time, the Buddha was staying at Anāthapiṇḍada’s Park in Jeta’s Grove of Śrāvastī.

2. It was then that the Bhagavān addressed the monks, “Form is impermanent. What’s impermanent is painful. What’s painful is not self. What’s not self doesn’t belong to self, either. Such an observation is called a true and correct observation. Thus, feeling … perception … volition … consciousness is impermanent. What’s impermanent is painful. What’s painful is not self. What’s not self doesn’t belong to self, either. Such an observation is called a true and correct observation.

3. “Noble disciples thus observe and tire of form. They tire of sensation … perception … volition … consciousness. Because they tire of it, they don’t enjoy it. Because they don’t enjoy it, they attain liberation. Liberation gives rise to this true knowledge: ‘My births have been ended, the religious practice has been established, and the task has been accomplished. I myself know that I won’t be subject to a later existence.’”

4. The monks who heard what the Buddha taught rejoiced and approved.

Notes

  1. This sūtra is parallel with SN 22.15 and similar to SN 22.16-17. [back]

Translator: Charles Patton

Last Revised: 19 September 2020